727 San Bernardino

727 San Bernardino

727 San Bernardino
707 San Bernardino

707 San Bernardino

707 San Bernardino
737 Blackpool

737 Blackpool

737 Blackpool
737 San Bernardino

737 San Bernardino

737 San Bernardino
737 Post-burn

737 Post-burn

737 Post-burn
747 Heathrow

747 Heathrow

747 Heathrow

A320 Blackpool

A320 Blackpool

A320 Blackpool
A310 Blackpool

A310 Blackpool

A310 Blackpool

A380 Teesside

A380 Teesside

A380 Teesside
Carvair Blackpool

Carvair Blackpool

Carvair Blackpool
Carvair Blackpool

Carvair Blackpool

Carvair Blackpool

Jumbo 01

Jumbo 01

Jumbo 01
747 Schiphol

747 Schiphol

747 Schiphol
SB Ladder

SB Ladder

SB Ladder
Serco 05

Serco 05

Serco 05
Zeppelin

Zeppelin

Zeppelin

A plane crash, like any disaster, is a moment of contingency and confusion. Large aircraft are reduced to virtually nothing in a matter of seconds. The disaster itself cannot be seen beneath a thick cloud of black smoke, leaving no trace other than the visceral scent of aviation fuel, burnt foliage, and death.

Yet the air disaster exists in our cultural imagination as spectacle. An airliner in vertical descent is a symbol of modernity’s failure. This is why air transport is highly prized by the terrorist. It is a mainline to human fear, something horrifying but also aesthetically powerful and symbolic of unstoppable globalization.

The hyper-functional, pared down forms in Mosse’s photographs speak of mass anxiety, routine submission to terrible fear, as well as our desire to see, to experience an air disaster. Charred and phallic, these are monuments built to our own fear. They are built not to assuage our fear, but to make it concrete, to articulate our worst nightmares, so that we may ritualize our helplessness.

These provisional structures bear an uncanny resemblance to Minimal sculptural form, but one that has been designed automatically. As life-size replicas of the air disaster, their toy-like nature is made formidable and sublime. The work locates a ‘big toys for big boys’ philosophy on the map of disaster politics. These are anonymous sculptures which speak unselfconsciously about our ambivalence to terror, their phallic form baldly revealing our unconscious desire for disaster.